Posted by: montclairlibrary | April 18, 2020

Poems-in-Place: “I Remember” by LaLa

I Remember
By LaLa

So I thought you seemed familiar, I looked into your eyes and they looked so
fascinating

I really don’t know why, they drew me in and they haven’t let me go

De-Ja-Vu, Did you ever say that to me before

Impossible, I just met you, we never had a long conversation, or never shared
an invocation

When you’re near, I feel so safe, when your away, I fear you will never return

What did you say?

I saw you in a dream only I was fully awake, I saw you riding on a camel in a
dusty fog

I could see the pyramids in the distance moving further away as you rode
steadfast my way

My eyes were partially covered and my headdress was heavy almost as heavy
as the jewels that adorned me

But my heart was light and iridescent anxiously awaiting my King

Oh did I embarrass you no need to blush, this is only some sort of stupid
crush; I probably made it all up

What, you don’t think I’m nuts you felt it too, a familiarity of sort, something
infallible to the touch

You’ve actually wanted to bring it up, but you felt foolish and believed I would too. Now certainly we must agree this is some sort of De-Ja-Vu

 

All rights reserved.

Posted by: montclairlibrary | April 17, 2020

Poems-in-Place: “Repeat Performance” by Grace Marie Grafton

Repeat Performance
By Grace Marie Grafton

It isn’t a matter of starting on time, no apology needed.
Personal grief must be respected when exhuming a body,
careful handling of prevailing emotions as well as material
parts. The few hairs, the bony eminences, the area
around the eyes. Does any expression remain?
Eerie, how clothing can capture a sense of life.

Easy to understand why people like a cemetery, quiet life
still exists, grass, some trees, the bugs birds need,
the birds bugs need for transformation. One body
into another, maybe why a cemetery can materialize
its earnest peace. The visitors singing their silent arias.
The dead expecting to understand nothing of what remains.

I could argue with the gods, I could say, “Why remain
so unknown and cold? Are you cold? Do you live
in an amoeba or in the peacock’s tail? I need
to have more than a packet of seeds and a body
that continues to prove its reticence to materialize
perfection.” This brief, brief time, my tiny area.

Where blessings come from. The perfect apple paring, air
after the first fall rain, how we finally understand remainder
in long division. Years do divide into increments, life
during the eager stages when the corduroy shirt met the need
for personal expression. The mad dash when the body
drives crazily into the maelstrom of sex, to materialize

again, raucous dance against the only wall that matters.
Cemetery wall. We are driven by death, mocking area
of in-expertise. The popularity of homicide dramas remains
uncontested. A poet writes repeatedly about road kill, life-
blood smeared into macabre art on pavement canvas. We need
to carefully lift one tissue away from another, sniff the body’s

cessation, ask again, “Is this the way my own dear body
will cave in on itself?” Try to figure out what matters,
is it possible to call plaintively enough into the void – area
as closed off to us as the gods – “What part of you remains?
Can you whisper me one word? Maybe ‘love,’ maybe ‘life’,”
meaning of course, that life after death is all that we need.

Every pearl of matter, the atrocious armature on the alligator’s
body, the lively comb shaking on the stellar jay’s head,
the universal need to remain like a scent in the air.

Posted by: montclairlibrary | April 16, 2020

Poems-in-Place: “Just Beyond” by Joanne Jagoda

Just Beyond
By Joanne Jagoda

I try to recall
cousin Celia’s third husband
you know…what’s-his-name
or that actor from Breaking Bad

but names elude me
hover just beyond reach
wily fugitives
from my once impeccable memory

they hang in that murky space
I can no longer reach with alacrity

sit defiantly on the tip of my tongue
so bratty– they sneak home at three in the morning
when they wake me up
and give me the finger

I used to spout the prologue of Romeo and Juliet
answer the questions on Jeopardy before the buzzer

this aging thing– it’s a bitch
hey, this is me who danced to the Doors
I thought I would surely dodge that bullet

and I don’t get why bad memories linger
like the burnt smell after a fire
stuff you wish you could forget
why can’t those thoughts
retire for good to that place of hazy recall

ah…but it’s the faded snapshots I treasure the most
sweet images of good times
ebbing and flowing like gentle currents
gathering on the banks of my mind—

I will fight against this aging thing
but I fear the battle is just getting started.

Posted by: montclairlibrary | April 15, 2020

Poems-in-Place: “Juliet” by Mary Mackey

Today’s poem is by Mary Mackey, from her new collection The Jaguars That Prowl Our Dreams, which won the 2019 Eric Hoffer Award for the best book published by a small press.

Juliet
by Mary Mackey

I was a green girl
fourteen and fresh
my breasts curled
so tight in my chest
that they ached
time pulled through
my body like sap
and I thought love
grew everywhere
like milkweed

Romeo was a human
swagger
we drove over the state
line near the end
of spring
and were married by
a judge in stripped
pajamas
who loaned us a
cigar band
for a ring

I said
look how the dogwood is
in bloom
like the lips of small children
in the naked woods
and Romeo said
let’s stop
for a cheeseburger

I said
when I see a river
I imagine a mouth
at the end
that could swallow us
both

I said
this is the beginning
of a great adventure
I said
I have escaped
into love
and I’ll never be
unhappy again

but there was wax
to take off the kitchen floor
and diapers to wash
and Romeo snored
and I found that love
grows around the heart
like the bark on a
tree
and we had three
children
and nobody died
and you can wait forever
for the balcony scene

© 2018 Mary Mackey
From The Jaguars That Prowl Our Dreams: New and Selected Poems

Posted by: montclairlibrary | April 14, 2020

Poems-in-Place: “Not as Sweet” by Sheryl J. Bize-Boutte

Not as Sweet
By Sheryl J. Bize-Boutte

This one is not as sweet
As the one before it
I was taken in by its good looks
The rich green color
The dark and perfect striping
I thumped it
Sniffed it
Weighed it in my hand
And then I took it home

With the first cut
The signs of heartbreak were there
Thick, tough and resistant to my instruments
It fought the quartering
Railed against separation from the rind
Exacted revenge by making me the fool
Tissue paper flesh should be discarded
But I am hungrily devoted
To the bland watery chunks
Tasteless and diluted as they may be
To partake is to be the same

Fighting the seduction of inviting aroma
And the whispers that outside pretty
Means the inside is just as
Because you know when they get together
They don’t always tell the truth

This one is not as sweet
As the one before it
And even knowing that
I sprinkle the sugar
And devour it anyway

 

Copyright © 2010 by Sheryl J. Bize-Boutte

Posted by: montclairlibrary | March 26, 2020

Books set in Oakland

Fiction set in Oakland, a list by the Friends of Montclair Library

At our last book club meeting (back when we still had in-person meetings – man, I remember it like it was two weeks ago…), some of you asked for recommendations of other books set in Oakland. Here are some places to start:

And if you’re interested in non-fiction books about Oakland, see our previous post about Oakland history books.

Did we miss any? Leave a comment and let us know if there are Oakland books we should add to our list.

Speaking of the book club: We’re working on a way to host our May book club discussion of Telegraph Avenue virtually via Zoom. The library’s license on the ebook version has run out so it’s not available through the library, but as of today it’s still available as an e-audiobook through the Hoopla app. Or, if you can afford it, support a local bookstore in these tough times and buy a physical or electronic copy through them – A Great Good Place for Books, which has partnered with FOML on a number of events, sells ebooks through Kobo and e-audiobooks through Libro.fm, and also has some ability to order physical books for delivery while they are closed. Many other Bay Area bookstores have similar set-ups, if you have a favorite.

Posted by: montclairlibrary | March 22, 2020

This Week at Montclair Library: March 23-29, 2020

In the interest of public health, the library is closed this week and all programs are canceled. Please check here or at oaklandlibrary.org for updates about the closure.

Electric car photo by Noya Fields

Tuesday, March 24, 2020
Electric Vehicles 101: Everything You Need to Know about Owning an Electric Vehicle – 6:30pm
Join us for a talk presented by Elena Engel (350 San Francisco) and Suzanne Loosen (SF Department of the Environment) to learn all about driving an electric vehicle. Get all your questions answered by two experts in the field so you can make an informed decision to go electric! This event is free and advance sign-up is not required, but speakers would appreciate having you register on Eventbrite if possible so they know how many people to expect.

Wednesday, March 25, 2020
Build/Make/Play – 2:30pm
Join us Wednesday afternoons for creative opportunities! Each week we will be making something new! Some of the projects will include paper crafts, building with LEGO, making slime and more!

Thursday, March 26, 2020
Toddler Storytime – 10:15-10:50am
Songs, active rhymes and stories especially for ages 18 months to 3 years, followed by playtime! Make new friends and play with toys.

Baby Bounce – 11:30-11:50am
Play, sing and rhyme one on one with your baby from birth to 18 months, followed by playtime! Make new friends and play with toys.

Saturday, March 28, 2020
Family Storytime – 11:00am
Stories, songs and rhymes for all ages, followed by playtime!


Photo credit: Noya Fields / Creative Commons

Posted by: montclairlibrary | March 15, 2020

This Week at Montclair Library: March 16-22, 2020

In the interest of public health, the library is closed this week and all programs are canceled. Please check here or at oaklandlibrary.org for updates about the closure.

Tuesday, March 17, 2020
Lawyers in the Library – 6:00-7:30pm
Free legal information and referrals, third Tuesday evenings. Lottery sign-up will start at 5:45pm. Please call on day of program to confirm it’s happening. The program is co-sponsored by Alameda County Bar Association.

Wednesday, March 18, 2020
Build/Make/Play – 2:30pm
Join us Wednesday afternoons for creative opportunities! Each week we will be making something new! Some of the projects will include paper crafts, building with LEGO, making slime and more!

Thursday, March 19, 2020
Toddler Storytime – 10:15-10:50am
Songs, active rhymes and stories especially for ages 18 months to 3 years, followed by playtime! Make new friends and play with toys.

Baby Bounce – 11:30-11:50am
Play, sing and rhyme one on one with your baby from birth to 18 months, followed by playtime! Make new friends and play with toys.

Saturday, March 21, 2020
Family Storytime – 11:00am
Stories, songs and rhymes for all ages, followed by playtime!

Posted by: montclairlibrary | March 13, 2020

COVID-19 Update

Official word from OPL today: Effective Monday, March 16, the Oakland Public Library will close all Library locations, and these closures will remain in effect until further notice. This action was taken as a precaution to help limit the spread of novel coronavirus (COVID-19). Read their full statement here.

Due dates and holds will automatically be extended to accommodate the closure period. All drop boxes will be locked and unavailable during the closure – please keep any library items you have at home until the library re-opens.

All programs scheduled during the closure period have been cancelled.

Now is a great time to make use of the many digital services the library offers, including ebooks, movies, online newspapers, audiobooks, digital music and more. If you need help learning to use these services, please email us and we’ll try to set you up with a phone consultation with a volunteer to help you get started. (And if you’re home from work or school with some time on your hands and would be willing to volunteer some time on the phone helping people learn to use the library’s digital services, please email us about that, too.) We’ll get through this together.

Posted by: montclairlibrary | March 8, 2020

This Week at Montclair Library: March 9-15, 2020

Tuesday, March 10, 2020
Montclair Book Club – 6:30pm
Join us in celebrating Montclair Library’s 90th anniversary in 2020 with a year long book club featuring books set in Oakland! This month we’re discussing The 57 Bus: A True Story of Two Teenagers and the Crime that Changed Their Lives by Dashka Slater.

P.S. We’ve announced the rest of the books for the year – if your favorite isn’t on here, don’t despair; if there’s enough interest we might keep the club going in 2021. Stay tuned!

Wednesday, March 11, 2020
Build/Make/Play – 2:3
Join us Wednesday afternoons for creative opportunities! Each week we will be making something new! Some of the projects will include paper crafts, building with LEGO, making slime and more!

Pop Up Teen Zone – 3:30-5:00pm
Come hang out and share suggestions for serving you better, make something cool and chat with your Teen Librarian about books, movies and more!

Thursday, March 12, 2020
Toddler Storytime – 10:15-10:50am
Songs, active rhymes and stories especially for ages 18 months to 3 years, followed by playtime! Make new friends and play with toys.

Baby Bounce – 11:30-11:50am
Play, sing and rhyme one on one with your baby from birth to 18 months, followed by playtime! Make new friends and play with toys.

Saturday, March 14, 2020
Family Storytime – 11:00am
Stories, songs and rhymes for all ages, followed by playtime!

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